School Course Calendar

A.School

1.1 and 1.3 School Goal and Philosophy

The vision of Ontario Virtual School is to empower all learners, through the use of technology to experience scholastic success. We strive to promote students to achieve their highest academic potential at a pace and timing that best supports their personal learning style. Research has demonstrated the tremendous importance and value of completing secondary education, not only for the individual but also for the community and other stakeholders. OVS is committed to working with students, and parents to enable all learners to accomplish their goals towards completing an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD).

1.2 Our Commitment

Each teenager has his or her own unique interests, goals and strengths. Yet, every student should have the same opportunity to succeed and graduate from high school. Bill 52, The Education Amendment Act, Learning to Age 18, 2006, mandates that teenagers must remain in school until the age of 18 however, every student learns in his or her own way. This is where Ontario Virtual School can play a significant role in the lives of many. OVS values the importance of successfully completing a secondary education and offers students an alternative means of achieving that.

1.4 School Organization

Ontario Virtual School operates on a continuous entry and exit model where there is no defined start date or end date. It is therefore the students’ responsibility to communicate their anticipated endpoint to the teacher and then adhere to that timeline (within reason). OVS is proud to announce that we support student learning 12 months of the year. As such we do not have pre-defined reporting dates. Upon completion of half the course, students will be provided with a Provincial midterm report card, and upon completion of the course the student (day school and/or post-secondary institutions and/or application centers if applicable) will receive a copy of the final report card.

1.5-1 Rights and Responsibilities of Students, Parents & Staff

Students have the right to:
know the summative assessment methods that will be used to assess their achievement to determine their grade in the course i.e. a rubric or marking scheme timely feedback on the quality of their work their performance information about the Ministry assessment & evaluation policy information regarding the consequences for academic dishonesty

Students are responsible for:
providing evidence of their achievement academic honesty work to the best of their ability work to teachers on time classes and being active participants in the learning and assessment process with teachers when there is difficulty in meeting timelines that missed work is completed within pre-established timelines communicating with parents’ assessment & evaluation methods, and pertinent due dates and timelines for work submission.

Teachers have the right to:
expect students to be active participants in their learning student assignments on time final deadlines for the submission of work professional judgment when assessing and evaluating student achievement expect students to be academically honest

Teachers are responsible for:
providing multiple and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their learning providing instruction and support to enable students to learn and practice good time management skills monitoring and maintaining a record of late assignments to be used in assessing learning skills and providing feedback to students and parents and returning student work in a timely manner so that students can improve their work to students the course expectations, the use of the achievement chart, category weightings the method of determining a grade in the course and the Ministry assessment/evaluation policy clear timelines which may include “windows” for work submission and/or collaborating with their students regarding timeline sand clearly communicating assignment due dates to students the meaning of academic honesty and methods for citing references. informing students and parents regarding how students can receive support for their learning during the course parents/guardians informed regarding the progress of their child and how they can support their child’s success facilitating a mutually agreed upon method of communicating with parents

Parents/guardians have the right to:
be informed regarding course requirements, assessment & evaluation methods, due dates and timelines for work submission information about their child’s performance access to their child’s course to get a first- hand look at how they are learning information about the Ministry assessment & evaluation policy a phone interview with their child’s teacher and/or the administration at a mutually agreed upon time. a face to face interview (parents night) with their child’s teacher

Parents/guardians are responsible for:
communicating regularly with the school and understanding how they can contribute to their child’s success initiating contact with teachers if and when difficulties arise actively monitoring their child’s progress and working collaboratively with the school, teacher and child to plan for their child’s improvement

Cheating and Plagiarism
“Learning is enhanced when students think independently and honestly”. It is expected that students will demonstrate respect for the intellectual property rights of others and adhere to a code of honor in all course activities. Students must understand that the tests/exams they complete and the assignments they submit for evaluation must be their own work and that cheating and plagiarism will not be condoned.

Plagiarism is defined by OVS as
The use of ideas or thoughts of a person other than the writer, without proper acknowledgement;

The use of direct quotations, or of material paraphrased and/or summarized by the writer;

The submission of an assignment that has been written in part or in whole by someone else as one’s own; and

The submission of material that has been obtained from a computerized source, with or without minor modifications, as one’s own.

Cheating is defined by OVS as
The buying and/or selling of assignments, or exam/test questions;

Submission of the same piece of work in more than one course without the permission of the teacher;

The preparation of an assignment by someone else other than the stated writer;
Allowing one’s assignment to be copied by someone else;

Providing another student your assignment;

The unauthorized giving or receiving of information or assistance during an examination or a test.

Academic dishonesty destroys the integrity of the program by diminishing the learning experience for the entire Ontario Virtual School community. Therefore, maintaining academic integrity is imperative. Whether intentional or through the ignorance of the policy, acts of academic dishonesty are unacceptable and will not be tolerated. These acts and the parties involved will receive a mark of zero for the assignment. In addition, all students involved will be subject to additional consequences which will be addressed on a case-by-case basis. These consequences will reflect a continuum of behavioral and academic responses and consequences, based on at least the following four factors:

  1. The grade level of the student,
  2. The maturity of the student,
  3. The number and frequency of incidents, and
  4. The individual circumstances of the student.

Appropriate Computer Use Policy
Learning Management System (LMS) at the Ontario Virtual School is designed for educational purposes only. All use of any LMS tool within course for any purpose other than the intended educational purpose is prohibited. The inappropriate uses include, but are not limited to, criminal, obscene, commercial, or illegal purposes.

The administration has the right to review all student work in order to determine the appropriateness of computer use. If the LMS is deemed to be used inappropriately, the Administration will levy consequences which may include suspensions and/or removal from the program. In some cases, further action may be taken including contacting day schools, legal representation or the police.

Students need to be very vigilant in order to prevent them getting into a situation where they may be suspected for inappropriate use.

Therefore, students are reminded to

  • Always protect their passwords and not share them with anyone
  • Always inform their teachers of suspicious messages or other incidents that they encounter
  • Always only access content that is intended for student use.

1.5-2 Student Achievement

The Assessment and Evaluation Policy for Ontario Virtual School is consistent with Ministry policy and reflects the vision that Ontario Virtual School has which is that the primary purpose of assessment is to improve student learning. Assessment is the process of gathering information that accurately reflects how well a student is achieving the curriculum expectations in a subject or course. Assessment for the purpose of improving student learning is seen as both “assessment for learning” and “assessment as learning”. As part of assessment for learning, teachers provide students with descriptive feedback and coaching for improvement. Teachers engage in assessment as learning by helping all students develop their capacity to be independent, autonomous learners who are able to set individual goals, monitor their own progress, determine next steps, and reflect on their thinking and learning. Ongoing per-assessments and formative assessments will be used to provide meaningful feedback about student progress and achievement in order to improve performance. Summative assessments will be used to arrive at the grade.

Course evaluation will be divided into two parts:

70% is based on cumulative evidence of summative evaluations undertaken throughout the semester; -30% is based on final evaluations which will take place in the final third of the course. Final evaluations may or may not include an exam depending on individual course curriculum policy documents. At the beginning of the course, students will receive course outlines that will include detailed assessment and evaluation information, and that also outline the percentage breakdown for both the 70% and the 30%. All courses will be evaluated according to the following breakdown:

Term work: 70% [based on Knowledge and Understanding, thinking and Investigation, Communication and Application]

Final Summatives 30% [based on Knowledge and Understanding, thinking and Investigation, Communication and Application]

Although each course will have the same breakdown, individual courses may have subject specific summative tasks that will be used to determine the student’s grade. Please refer to the course outline as it is presented in your courses for more details.

Second Chance Protocol

Based on the premise that the primary purpose of assessment and evaluation is to improve student learning, students will be given additional opportunities to demonstrate their learning if they are not successful on their first attempt. It will be at the teacher’s discretion and professional opinion on when to exercise this option.

Repetition of a Course

  • Only one credit is earned if course is repeated
  • In Grade 11 and 12, an “R” appears on the student’s OST for the course with the lower mark

Requesting Course Changing

Course transfer policy: A student who registers and is enrolled into a course for less than a week and does not complete an assessment in the course, may request to be transferred to another course. Students will only be granted one course transfer per enrollment. All course transfer requests must come within one week of the initial enrollment. The decision of the OVS Principal will be considered final in all cases involving student requests for course transfers.

Reporting Student Achievement

Ontario Virtual School will use the Provincial Report Card, Grades 9-12, for formal written reports sent home two times over the duration the student is active in the course. The first report reflects student achievement of the overall curriculum expectations during the first reporting period, as well as development of the learning skills and work habits. The final report reflects achievement of the overall expectations for the entire course, as well as development of the learning skills and work habits.

Learning Skills

The following Learning Skills guideline will be used by online teachers when assessing students Learning Skills:

Learning Skills and Habits Sample Behaviors
Responsibility The Student

  • Fulfill responsibilities and commitments within the learning environment;
  • Completes and submits class work, homework, and assignments according to the agreed-upon timelines;
  • Take responsibilities for and manages own behavior.
Organization The Student

  • Devises and follows a plan and process for completing work and tasks;
  • Establishes priorities and manages time to complete tasks and achieve goals;
  • Identifies, gathers, evaluates, and uses information, technology, and resources to complete tasks.
Independent Work The Student

  • Independently monitors, assess, and revises plans to complete tasks and meet goals;
  • Uses class time appropriately to complete tasks;
  • Follows instructions with minimal supervision
Collaboration The Student

  • Accepts various roles and an equitable share of work in a group;
  • Responds positively to the ideas, opinions, values, and traditions of others;
  • Builds healthy peer-to-peer relationship through personal and media-assisted interactions;
  • Works with others to resolve conflicts and build consensus to achieve group goals;
  • Share information, resources, and expertise and promotes critical thinking to solve problems and make decisions
Initiate The Student

  • Looks for and acts on new ideas and opportunities for learning;
  • Demonstrates the capacity for innovation and a willingness to take risks;
  • Demonstrates curiosity and interest in learning;
  • Approaches new tasks with a positive attitude;
  • Recognizes and advocates appropriately for the rights of self and others.
Self-Regulation The Student

  • Set own individual goals and monitors progress towards achieving them;
  • Seek clarification or assistance when needed;
  • Assesses and reflects critically on own strengths, need, and interests;
  • Identifies learning opportunities, choices, and strategies to meet personal needs and achieve goals;
  • Perseveres and makes an effort when responding to challenges.

1.5-3 Attendance

Regular attendance is key to student success. Students who do not attend/log on regularly and/or who do not actively participate in their courses seriously jeopardize their opportunities to learn and reach their potential.

Teachers will monitor attendance patterns for their respective students and will work with them, and their parents/guardians to support students in any way they can. If student attendance issues cannot be resolved, the administration will be informed and possible consequences may include: student and parental/guardian contact, attendance contracts, or even removal from the program.

Attendance for record keeping purposes will be based on the number of completed lessons. For example, if a course has 20 different lessons to complete and the student has completed 16 of these, the attendance register would indicate that the student was in attendance 80% of the 110 hours per credit course. This value will be scaled accordingly for the mid-semester report card.

Students who do not complete their courses within 12 months will be removed from the course and will not be reinstated unless there are extenuating circumstances that can be verified by appropriate documentation

1.6 School’s Code of Conduct

Ontario Virtual School will attempt to provide and maintain a safe and supportive educational environment in which learning can occur. Protection of a person’s dignity and self-esteem is crucial and not negotiable.

All members of the Ontario Virtual School community, which includes students, staff and parents, will treat each other with respect in all interactions. Any actions determined to jeopardize the moral tone of the learning community including disrespectful, distasteful, abusive, harassing comments made to any of our community members will not be tolerated and will be dealt with swiftly by the OVS Principal. Consequences may include, counseling, parental involvement, suspension, expulsions and/ or the involvement of the authorities.

B.Diploma and Certificates

2.1 Compulsory Credit Requirements

Students interested in earning the OSSD (Ontario Secondary School Diploma) must successfully complete a total of 30 credits; of which 18 are prescribed and 12 credits are optional. In addition, students must also complete 40 hours of Community Involvement Activities and must meet the provincial literacy requirement.

Compulsory credits are:

  • 4 credits in English (1 credit per grade) *
  • 3 credits in mathematics (1 credit in Grade 11 or 12)
  • 2 credits in science
  • 1 credit in Canadian history
  • 1 credit in Canadian geography
  • 1 credit in the arts
  • 1 credit in health and physical education
  • 1 credit in French as a second language
  • 0.5 credit in career studies
  • 0.5 credit in civics

Plus one credit from each of the following groups:

  • 1 additional credit (group 1): additional credit in English, or French as a second language, ** or a Native language, or a classical or an international language, or social sciences, or Native studies or the humanities, or Canadian and world studies, or guidance and career education, or cooperative education***
  • 1 additional credit (group 2): additional credit in health and physical education, or the arts, or business studies, or French as a second language, ** or cooperative education***
  • 1 additional credit (group 3): additional credit in science (Grade 11 or 12), or technological education, or French as a second language, ** or computer studies, or cooperative education***

2.2 Optional Credits

In addition to the 18 compulsory credits described above, students must also complete an additional 12 Optional Credits.

2.3-1 OSSLT

One of the provincial requirements of all OSSD graduates is the successful completion of the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (or equivalent). Students are requested to make arrangements with the school office as soon as possible, no later than January 31 to confirm their eligibility of writing the literacy test. Any student that require accommodations, special provisions, deferrals or exemptions will need to make their request to the principal prior to registering for the literacy test.

2.3-2 OSSLC

Students who have been eligible to write the OSSLT at least twice and who have been unsuccessful at least once are eligible to take the course. (Students who have already met the literacy requirement for graduation may be eligible to take the course under special circumstances, at the discretion of the principal.)

This course is designed to help students acquire and demonstrate the cross-curricular literacy skills that are evaluated by the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). Students who complete the course successfully will meet the provincial literacy requirement for graduation.

Students will read a variety of informational, narrative, and graphic texts and will produce a variety of forms of writing, including summaries, information paragraphs, opinion pieces, and news reports. Students will also maintain and manage a portfolio containing a record of their reading experiences and samples of their writing.

2.4 Community Involvement

One of the purposes of the community involvement requirement is to develop strong ties between the students and their community, fostering valuable and long-term relationships. Students who are taking courses only through Ontario Virtual School and are not enrolled in any other school or program will be required to submit their record of community involvement if they have not yet completed the required 40 hours. Please see the list below of approved activities:

Activities approved:
Eligible Activities are volunteer activities that may be counted towards 40 community involvement
hours that must be accumulated by students as a graduation requirement. Eligible activities are
those activities that provide services to improve the community or well-being of its members and
may be performed for not-for-profit organizations. If an activity does not fall within the categories approved by the Board, and is not on the list of ineligible activities students must obtain written approval from the principal before beginning the activity.

Eligible Activities include:
Elementary Schools
– assist with school events, assist School Councils, activities for children;

Secondary Schools
– organization and leadership of school activities that benefit the community;

Animal Care
– volunteering in a zoo, animal shelter, or on a farm; Arts and Culture
– volunteering in galleries, libraries, community productions;

Charitable Organizations
– assisting with special events, programs, clerical tasks;

Child/Youth Programs
– assisting with child/youth programs, volunteering in a not-for-profit child care centre or camp;

Community Organizations
– assisting with special events, food banks, community support services, shelters, clerical tasks;

Community Service for Individuals
– assisting community members in need;

Environmental Projects
– flower/tree planting, beautification projects, recycling projects, recycling depot;

Health Agencies
– volunteering in hospitals, hospices, Canadian Blood Services (volunteering to organize or assist with a blood donor clinic), donating blood (time required to donate);

Law Enforcement Agencies
– volunteering for activities sponsored by the police;

Political Organizations
– activities related to legitimate and recognized political organizations, municipal, provincial and federal political activities

Religious Organizations
– assisting with programs, special events;

Senior Citizens
– assisting in seniors’ residences, providing services for seniors in the community;

Sports and Recreation
– coaching, organizing special events, assisting with projects/events; or

Service Focused Club Activities
– those activities that expand community service to others beyond the school day (holiday dinner participation, environmental action activities, etc.).

If an eligible activity also falls within the definition of ineligible activities, the activity will be deemed ineligible.

Activities NOT approved:

An ineligible activity is an activity that:

  • involves any work for a for-profit organization;
  • is a requirement of a class or course in which the student is enrolled;
  • takes place during the time allotted for the instructional program on a school day with the exception of an activity that takes place during the student’s lunch breaks or “spare” periods, which is permissible;
  • takes place in a logging or mining environment, if the student is under 16 years of age;
  • takes place in a factory, if the student is under 15 years of age;
  • takes place in a workplace other than a factory, if the student is under 14 years of age and is not accompanied by an adult;
  • would normally be performed for wages by a person in the workplace;
  • involves the operation of a vehicle, power tools, or scaffolding;
  • involves the administration of any type or form of medication or medical procedure to other persons;
  • involves handling of substances classed as “designated substances” under the Occupational Health and Safety Act;
  • requires the knowledge of a tradesperson whose trade is regulated by the provincial government;
  • involves banking or the handling of securities, or the handling of jewellery, works of art, antiques, or other valuables;
  • consists of duties normally performed in the home or personal
  • involves a court-ordered program;

OVS is also required to provide students with a record keeping form they will need to track and log the community involvement hours, which once complete will be kept in the student’s OSR. Students are responsible for fulfilling this requirement on their own time. Click here for the form to record community service hours. Please contact the Principal of Ontario Virtual School if you have any further questions regarding community involvement as a prerequisite for the OSSD. If a student is unsure whether their intended community activity will satisfy the requirements, students and parents are requested to forward the notification of planned community involvement activity to the Principal prior to commencing. Click here for the notification of planned community involvement form.

2.5 Prerequisites, Exemptions, Substitutions and Alternative Studies

Prerequisites for Grade 11 and 12 courses are specified in the curriculum policy documents for the various disciplines. These can be viewed on the Ministry of Education website: In most cases, students will only be registered into a course once they have submitted documentation supporting their completion of the prerequisite course. For example, the prerequisite for the Grade 11 university preparation course in Math is the Grade 10 academic course in Math. A student who has completed a course of one type in a particular subject and grade that does not meet a stated prerequisite for a course in the same subject in the next grade but has completed a transfer course is equally eligible to take the requested course providing once again that supporting documentation is forwarded to OVS. In unique situations, mature students that do not have the prerequisite can apply for an exemption. This must be requested in writing to the Principal of Ontario Virtual School. The requesting student will have an opportunity to explain their circumstances. An example of such a case would be a student who has been out of any school system for more than one year. If you wish to apply for such consideration please send an email to [email protected] outlining the following information as well as forwarding your most recent transcript by email:

  • Name:
  • Contact information: Address, phone and email address
  • Date of Birth:
  • Last school attended and Year attended:
  • Reason for Request:
  • Special Circumstances:

Ontario Virtual School will not make substitutions for compulsory or optional courses; students are expected to complete all compulsory and optional courses as outlined in the Ministry of Educations OSSD graduation requirements.

Please download and complete the form below to be considered for prerequisite exemptions.

Prerequisite Exemption Form

Students can earn credits outside of OVS including ILC, distance education, public or private schools. Students must inform us confirming their enrollment as well as having that institutions forward us directly a record of completion.

2.6 Reach Ahead

Under certain conditions, elementary students may “reach ahead” to take secondary school courses. The principal of a student’s elementary school and the principal of a secondary school may decide, with parental consent, that it is appropriate for the student to enroll in one or more secondary courses. In such a case, the principal assumes responsibility for evaluating the student’s achievement and for granting and recording credits. (Ontario Schools, S. 2.5.2.1)

Elementary students who are eligible to “reach ahead” must also include the following with their registration:

  • Reach Ahead Enrollment Request – Form located below
  • Letter of recommendation from student’s current school principal
  • Most recent school report card

https://www.ontariovirtualschool.ca/reach-ahead-elementary-students/

C.Curriculum

3.1 The Ontario Secondary School Certificate

The Ontario Secondary School Certificate will be granted on request to students who leave school before earning the Ontario Secondary School Diploma, provided that they have earned a minimum of 14 credits distributed as follows:

Compulsory credits (total of 7)

  • 2 credits in English
  • 1 credit in Canadian geography or
  • Canadian history
  • 1 credit in mathematics
  • 1 credit in science
  • 1 credit in health and physical education
  • 1 credit in the arts or technological education

Optional credits (total of 7)
7 credits selected by the student from available courses. The provisions for making substitutions for compulsory credits (described in section 3.2: Substitutions for Compulsory Courses) also apply to the Ontario Secondary School Certificate. Ontario Virtual School currently does not offer the Ontario Secondary School certificate.

3.2 The Certificate of Accomplishment

Students who leave school before fulfilling the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma or the Ontario Secondary School Certificate may be granted a Certificate of Accomplishment. The Certificate of Accomplishment may be a useful means of recognizing achievement for students who plan to take certain vocational programs or other kinds of further training, or who plan to find employment after leaving school. The Certificate of Accomplishment will be accompanied by the student’s Ontario Student Transcript. For those students who have an IEP, a copy of the IEP may be included.

Students who return to school to complete additional credit and non-credit courses will have their transcript updated accordingly, but will not be issued a new Certificate of Accomplishment. The Ontario Secondary School Diploma or Ontario Secondary School Certificate will be granted when a student has fulfilled the appropriate requirements.

3.3 Credit definition

A credit is granted in recognition of the successful completion of a course which has been developed from an Ontario Ministry of Education guideline, and for which a minimum of 110 hours of instructional time has been scheduled. The credit is granted by the Principal of a school offering secondary school programs on behalf of the Ontario Ministry of Education.

3.4 Definition of Types of Courses

Students in Grades 9 & 10 will take their core courses (English, Mathematics, Science, French, Geography and History) in one of three levels – applied, academic. All elective courses will be taken at the open level.

Academic Level: “D”

Academic courses focus on the essential concepts of the discipline plus additional related concepts. Academic courses develop students’ knowledge and skills by emphasizing theoretical, abstract applications of the essential concepts while incorporating practical applications, as appropriate.

Applied Level: “P”

Applied courses focus on the essential concepts of the discipline. Applied courses develop students’ knowledge and skills by emphasizing practical, concrete applications of the essential concepts while incorporating theoretical applications, as appropriate.

Locally Developed Level: “L”

Locally Developed courses focus on the most essential concepts of a discipline. These courses are offered in Mathematics, Science, English and Canadian History. These courses will provide support for students making the transition to high school by enhancing their skills to allow them to be successful at secondary school.

Open Courses: “O”

Open level courses have one set of expectations for each subject and are appropriate for all students. Open level courses are offered for all non-core subjects and do not have a prescribed post-secondary destination.

Course Level Description for Grade 11 and 12 Courses:

Courses in grades 11 and 12 are offered in levels that are related to a student’s destination after high school – workplace, apprenticeships, college or university. Some courses are offered at the Open level. Most courses are offered at one other following five levels:

University/College Courses: “M”

Courses designed to prepare students for entrance to college and university programs following high school.

College Courses: “C”

Courses designed to prepare students for entrance to college programs following high school.

Workplace Courses: “E”

Courses designed for students planning to enter the workplace directly following high school.

Open Courses: “O”

Courses that are not specific to any particular post secondary destination are appropriate for all students, and which students may take to meet compulsory or optional requirements.

University Courses: “U”

Courses designed to prepare students for entrance to university programs following high school.

3.5 Course Coding System

The design of the Ontario education system at the secondary level is framed on the concept of students earning credits, both mandatory and optional credits. The course coding of all programs offered through OVS employ a 5-character system that is established and recognized by the Ministry of Education; for example:

M1C2V344U5

The first digit indicates the major area of study for the course; for example, M-mathematics, S-science, E-english the second and third digit serves as the course descriptor within the subject area; CV- calculus and vectors, BI-biology the forth digit signifies the grade level; 1 is grade 9, 2 is grade 10, 3 is grade 11 and 4 is grade 12 The fifth and last digit is used to denote the intensity by which the course will be delivered. In grade 9 & 10 options include D representing academic, P for applied and O for open level courses. In grade 11 & 12, this digit is geared towards the post-secondary destination: U is university, C is for college and M represents courses open to university or college.

At Ontario Virtual School, we offer a variety of D, P, M, C, E, O and U level courses. These courses are sufficient to satisfy both the required and elective components towards the OSSD.

3.6 Description of Courses

Below is an abbreviated course description of the courses that Ontario Virtual School currently offers. Anyone interested in obtaining a more detailed course profile package is directed to make their request to the teacher.

Grade 12

Course CodeCourse Description
ADA4MGrade 12 Drama encourages students to experiment with the forms and conventions of both drama and theatre from various cultures and time periods. In this course, students will interpret dramatic literature, engage with theories of directing and acting, and apply their knowledge of dramatic styles and conventions through creative and dramatic expression!

Prerequisite: ADA3M
AWQ4MGrade 12 Photography allows students to develop their understanding of visual storytelling through the art of photography. In this course, students will review the basic principles of design and visual culture and will learn how to manipulate meaning using context and framing. As they work through the course, students will explore various photographic mediums and stages of the creative process, as well as concepts of composition, lighting, audience, and perspective.

Prerequisite: AWQ3M
BAT4MGrade 12 Accounting introduces students to advanced accounting principles that will prepare them for post-secondary studies in business. Students will learn about financial statements for various forms of business ownership and how those statements are interpreted in making business decisions. This course expands student’s knowledge of sources of financing, further develops accounting methods for assets, and introduces accounting for partnerships and corporations.

Prerequisite: BAF3M
BBB4MGrade 12 International Business examines the importance of international business and trade for our global economy and explores factors influencing success in international markets. Throughout this course, students will discover the techniques and strategies associated with effective marketing, distribution, and managing of international business. This course prepares students for post secondary programs in business, including international business, marketing and management.

Prerequisite: None
BBB4MFGrade 12 French Immersion International Business examines the importance of international business and trade for our global economy and explores factors influencing success in international markets. Throughout this course, students will discover the techniques and strategies associated with effective marketing, distribution, and managing of international business. This course prepares students for post secondary programs in business, including international business, marketing and management.

Prerequisite: None
BOH4MBOH4M focuses on developing the leadership skills used in managing a successful business. Throughout this course, students will analyze the role of a leader in business, with a focus on managing group dynamics and motivating employees, dealing with workplace stress and conflict, as well as decision-making and planning.

Prerequisite: None
CGR4MGrade 12 Environment and Resource Management encourages students to investigate the interactions between natural and human systems, placing particular emphasis on the impacts of human activity on ecosystems and natural processes. Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to use their knowledge of geographic concepts and spatial skills to analyse these impacts and propose ways of reducing them. Through the various units of this course, students will: assess resource management and sustainability practices, including related government policies and international accords; consider questions of individual responsibility and environmental stewardship; and explore various ways of developing a more sustainable relationship with their environment.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 or 12 university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
CGW4UGrade 12 Environment and Resource Management encourages students to investigate the interactions between natural and human systems, placing particular emphasis on the impacts of human activity on ecosystems and natural processes. Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to use their knowledge of geographic concepts and spatial skills to analyse these impacts and propose ways of reducing them. Through the various units of this course, students will: assess resource management and sustainability practices, including related government policies and international accords; consider questions of individual responsibility and environmental stewardship; and explore various ways of developing a more sustainable relationship with their environment.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 or 12 university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
CHY4UThis course allows students to trace major developments and events in world history, reaching as far back as 1450. In doing so, students will explore the historical roots of contemporary issues, the role of conflict and cooperation in global interrelationships, as well as examining the broad social, economic, and political changes that have transpired over the past six centuries. Throughout the course, students will be challenged to apply the concepts of historical thinking in the interpretation and analysis of evidence as they investigate key issues and ideas and assess whether society has progressed or declined over time.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 or 12 university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
CIA4UGrade 12 Economics encourages students to investigate the nature of the competitive global economy and explores how individuals and societies can gain the information they need to make appropriate economic decisions. Throughout this course, students will learn about the principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics, apply economic models and concepts to interpret economic information, assess the validity of statistics, and investigate marketplace dynamics. Students will use economic inquiry and communication skills to analyze current economic issues, make informed judgements, and present their findings.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 or 12 university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
CLN4UGrade 12 Law examines elements of Canadian and international law in social, political, and global contexts. Students will study the historical and philosophical sources of law and the principles and practices of international law and will learn to relate them to issues in Canadian society and the wider world.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 or 12 university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
CPW4UThis course allows students to investigate political issues, events, and developments of both national and international importance, developing and communicating informed opinions about them. They will explore political decision-making and the ways in which various individuals, groups, and institutions address political issues both within Canada and internationally.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 or 12 university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
EBT4OEBT4O emphasizes the kinds of practical writing and communication skills needed in the world of business and technology. Throughout the course, students will analyze the characteristics of effective models of business and technical communications, all the while gathering information to write reports, business letters, memos, manuals, instructions, and brochures. They will also learn how to integrate graphics and text, using technology appropriately for formatting and special effects.

Prerequisite: ENG3U or ENG3C or ENG3E
ENG4CGrade 12 College English seeks to consolidate the literacy and communication skills, as well as the critical and creative thinking skills, necessary for success in both academic and daily life. Throughout this course, students will analyse a variety of informational and graphic texts, as well as literary texts from various countries and cultures. They will also create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms for both practical and academic purposes. An important focus of this course will be on using language with precision and clarity and developing greater control in writing.

Prerequisite: ENG3C
ENG4UGrade 12 University English seeks to consolidate the literacy and communication skills, as well as the critical and creative thinking skills, necessary for success in both academic and daily life. Throughout this course, students will analyse a range of challenging literary, informational, and graphic texts from various periods, countries, and cultures. They will also create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. The three key focuses of this course will be: #1) using academic language with confidence and clarity, #2) selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading and #3) developing greater control in one’s writing.

Prerequisite: ENG3U
EWC4UGrade 12 Writer’s Craft seeks to develop the student’s existing knowledge and skills related to the art of writing. Throughout the various units of this course, students will: analyze models of effective writing; adopt a workshop approach to produce a range of works; identify techniques required for specialized forms of writing; and use a variety of methods to improve the overall quality of their writing. Throughout the course, students will work towards completing a major paper as part of a creative or analytical independent study project. The course concludes with an exploration of career opportunities in the publishing industry.

Prerequisite: ENG3U
FIF4UGrade 12 French Immersion provides students with extensive opportunities to communicate, interact, and think critically and creatively in French. Throughout this course, students will consolidate their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and apply language learning strategies while communicating about both concrete and abstract topics. They will independently respond to a variety of oral and written French literature from the Middle Ages to the present. They will also enrich their understanding of diverse French-speaking communities.

Prerequisite: FIF3U
FSF4UGrade 12 Core French provides extensive opportunities for students to communicate and interact in French independently. In this course, students will develop their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills; apply language learning strategies in a wide variety of real-life situations; and develop their creative and critical thinking skills by responding to and interacting with a variety of oral and written texts. They will also enrich their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, with each unit focusing on a particular Francophone community.

Prerequisite: FSF3U
HFA4UHFA4U explores the relationships between food, energy balance, and nutritional status; our nutritional needs at different stages of life; and the role of nutrition in health and disease. Throughout this course, students will evaluate nutrition-related trends and examine how food choices can promote food security and environmental responsibility. They will also learn about healthy eating, expand their repertoire of food-preparation techniques, and develop their social science research skills by investigating issues related to nutrition and health.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 or 12 university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
HFA4UFHFA4UF explores the relationships between food, energy balance, and nutritional status; our nutritional needs at different stages of life; and the role of nutrition in health and disease. Throughout this course, students will evaluate nutrition-related trends and examine how food choices can promote food security and environmental responsibility. They will also learn about healthy eating, expand their repertoire of food-preparation techniques, and develop their social science research skills by investigating issues related to nutrition and health.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 or 12 university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
HHG4MHHG4M offers a multidisciplinary approach to the study of human development throughout the life cycle. In this course, students will examine how early brain and childhood development are linked to lifelong learning, health, and well-being. They will develop child-care and human-relationship skills through lessons and activities with practical applications.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 or 12 university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
HHS4UGrade 12 Families in Canada examines issues and challenges facing individuals and families in Canada’s diverse society. In this course, students will draw on sociological, anthropological and psychological theories and research to examine factors affecting families and assess policies and practices intended to support Canadian families.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 or 12 university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
HHS4UFGrade 12 French Immersion Families in Canada examines issues and challenges facing individuals and families in Canada’s diverse society. In this course, students will draw on sociological, anthropological and psychological theories and research to examine factors affecting families and assess policies and practices intended to support Canadian families.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 or 12 university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
HNB4MGrade 12 Fashion (HNB4M) gives students the opportunity to explore the world of fashion. Students will learn how to create a fashion product using various tools, techniques, and technologies while developing their practical skills. Students will learn about various factors that affect the global fashion industry, the needs of specialized markets, and the impact of fibre and fabric production and care. In addition, they will learn about social and historical influences on fashion. Students will apply research skills when investigating aspects of the fashion world.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 or 12 university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
HRE4MHRE4M explores a Catholic understanding of moral living by encouraging students to learn the philosophical and scriptural foundations of ethical thinking and action. Throughout this course, various moral and social issues are studied and evaluated, through the lens of the experiences and traditions of the Catholic Church.

Prerequisite: None
HRE4OThis course aims to assist students in understanding themselves as moral persons living the way of Christ, through an examination of the revelation of Sacred Scripture, and the experience and teaching of the Catholic Church. It engages students in critical theological reflection on significant contemporary moral and ethical issues, as well as social and ecological justice issues.

Prerequisite: None
HSB4UGrade 12 Challenge & Change focuses on the use of social science theories, perspectives, and methodologies to understand and explain the societal impact of shifts in attitudes and behaviour. Throughout this course, students will critically analyze how and why cultural, social, and behavioural patterns change over time. They will explore the ideas of social theorists and use these ideas to analyze causes of, and responses to, challenges such as technological change, deviance, and global inequalities.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 or 12 university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
HZT4UGrade 12 Philosophy allows students to better understand of the broad nature of philosophy through the exploration of metaphysics, ethics, social and political philosophy. Throughout this course, students will develop their critical thinking and philosophical reasoning skills as they create and evaluate arguments surrounding various philosophical questions and theories.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 or 12 university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
ICS4UGrade 12 Computer Science allows students to further develop their knowledge and skills in computer science. In this course, students will be asked to use modular design principles to create complex and fully documented programs according to industry standards. Throughout the various units, students will work through the steps of managing a large software development project, from planning through to project review. We will also investigate some of the ethical and environmental issues in computing and discuss emerging technologies, areas of research, and careers within the field of computer science.

Prerequisite: ICS3U
LKBDUGrade 12 Mandarin (LKBDU) explores a broad range of themes and ideas expressed through poetry, novels, plays, and Chinese history. Students will engage with the texts and analyze them through a lens that allows them to connect literature and history to real life issues, and explore how these themes can span over centuries to still be a reflection on today's society.

Prerequisite: LKBCU or Assessment Test
LYFDUGrade 12 Farsi (Persian) (LYFDU) provides extended opportunities for students to communicate and interact in Farsi in a variety of social and academic contexts. Students will refine and enhance their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, as well as their creative and critical thinking skills, as they explore and respond to a variety of oral and written texts, including complex authentic and adapted texts. They will also broaden their understanding and appreciation of diverse communities where Farsi is spoken, and develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Prerequisite: LYFCU or Assessment Test
MAP4CGrade 12 College Math allows students to broaden their understanding of the real-world applications of mathematics. Throughout this course, students will learn to reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems in various areas.

Prerequisite: MBF3C or MCF3M
MCT4CThis course encourages students to extend their knowledge of functions. Students will investigate and apply properties of polynomial, exponential, and trigonometric functions; continue to represent functions numerically, graphically, and algebraically; develop facility in simplifying expressions and solving equations; and solve problems that address applications of algebra, trigonometry, vectors, and geometry.

Prerequisite: MCR3U or MCF3M
MCV4UGrade 12 Calculus & Vectors (MCV4U) builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three-dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields such as science, engineering, economics, and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university-level calculus, linear algebra, or physics course.

Prerequisite: MCR3U
MDM4UGrade 12 Data Management (MDM4U) broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods of organizing and analysing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences and the humanities will find this course of particular interest.

Prerequisite: MCR3U or MCF3M
MHF4UGrade 12 Advanced Functions extends students experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; develop techniques for combining functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. **This course is intended both for students taking the Calculus and Vectors course as a prerequisite for a university program and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs.

Prerequisite: MCR3U or MCT4C
NDW4MIn this Grade 12 Indigenous Studies course, students will examine global issues from the perspectives of Indigenous peoples, investigating topics such as identity, social justice, human rights, spirituality, resilience, and advocacy for change. Students will draw on the depth and diversity of Indigenous cultures, traditions, and knowledge to consider how Indigenous communities around the world persevere despite current global political, social, and economic challenges. Throughout this course, students will learn about the threats to cultural survival posed by trends such as the loss of land as an economic base, environmental decline, lack of sovereignty/self-governance, the legacy of colonialism, globalization, language loss, and gender-based discrimination facing Indigenous women and girls. By encouraging students to examine the political, economic, and social context for a variety of interactions between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations in several regions of the world, NDW4M helps students build knowledge and skills that prepare them for meaningful participation in a globalized society. As students make connections between contemporary global issues and cultural survival, they learn that all cultures benefit when Indigenous values, rights, and aspirations are respected. Students not only explore the impact of global trends on Indigenous lives and lived experiences but they also discover ways in which Indigenous knowledge and leadership can support efforts to address issues affecting all peoples. Students may investigate the benefits of incorporating Indigenous perspectives into resource management, for example, or of employing Indigenous leadership approaches within organizational structures. By exploring the values reflected in Indigenous concepts such as the two-eyed seeing model and planning for future generations – and by investigating how these values can guide approaches to the complex issues facing nations and peoples around the world – students extend their understanding of the contributions that Indigenous cultures make, and the value they add, to the global community. They also develop their awareness of the critical importance of building relationships based on truth and mutual respect.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 or 12 university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in Social Sciences and Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies.
OLC4OTo participate fully in the society and workplace of the twenty-first century, today’s students will need to be able to use language skillfully and confidently. The Ontario curriculum recognizes the central importance of reading and writing skills in learning across the curriculum and in everyday life, and prepares students for the literary demands they will face in their post – secondary endeavors. To ensure that they have the essential competencies in reading and writing that they will need to succeed at school, at work, and in daily life, students in Ontario must demonstrate those skills as a requirement for graduation. The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC) is a full-credit Grade 12 course that is offered as a part of the English program to provide students with intensive support in achieving the required reading and writing competencies. The reading and writing competencies required by the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) form the instructional assessment core of the course.

Prerequisite: Students who have been eligible to write the OSSLT at least twice and who have been unsuccessful at least once are eligible to take the course.
PSK4UGrade 12 Introduction to Kinesiology focuses on the study of human movement, factors in human development and how physical activity impacts the body. Throughout the course, you will be asked to analyze how physiological, psychological and social factors impact individual participation in sport. We will also discuss the history of sports.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 university (U) or university/college (M) preparation course in science, or any Grade 11 or 12 course in health and physical education.
SBI4UGrade 12 Biology allows students an in-depth look at the processes occurring in the biological systems all around them – and even inside their own bodies! Throughout the course, students will study theory and conduct investigations across many fascinating fields of biology.

Prerequisite: SBI3U
SCH4CThis course allows students to develop a solid understanding of chemistry. Throughout the course, students will use a variety of laboratory techniques, develop skills in data collection and scientific analysis, and communicate scientific information using appropriate terminology. There will also be an overarching emphasis on the role of chemistry in daily life and the effects of technological applications and processes on society and the environment.

Prerequisite: SNC2P or SNC2D
SCH4UThis course provides students with a deeper understanding of chemistry. Throughout the course, they will have multiple opportunities to refine their ability to communicate scientific data, as well as further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they explore various chemical processes. There will be an overarching emphasis on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment.

Prerequisite: SCH3U
SES4UGrade 12 Earth and Space Science takes an in-depth look at our amazing planet Earth and its place in the universe. Throughout the course, students will investigate the properties and forces of our solar system and analyse some of the techniques scientists use to generate knowledge about them. In doing so, students will examine Earth’s basic materials, its geological history, and how its systems interact and change over time.

Prerequisite: SNC2D
SPH4CGrade 12 College Physics allows students to deepen their understanding of the basic concepts in physics, including motion, electricity, magnetism and energy transformation. Throughout this course, students will develop their scientific investigation skills as they test laws of physics and solve both assigned and emergent problems stemming from hands-on investigations. They will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

Prerequisite: SNC2P or SNC2D
SPH4UGrade 12 Physics allows students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. In this course, students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that affect motion. They will investigate electrical, gravitational, and magnetic fields, as well as electromagnetic radiation. Students will also have the chance to explore topics such as the wave nature of light, quantum mechanics, and special relativity. Throughout the course, they will further develop their scientific investigation skills, learning how to analyze data related to a variety of physics concepts and principles both qualitatively and quantitatively. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

Prerequisite: SPH3U

Grade 11

Course CodeCourse Description
AWQ3MIn Grade 11 Photography, students will explore the features and settings of the digital camera as they learn to take photos that express meaning and reflect their individual style. AWQ3M will also discuss the history, evolution, and social influence of the art of photography, drawing connections between the digital revolution and 21st century society.

Prerequisite: AVI1O or AVI2O
BAF3MGrade 11 Accounting introduces students to the fundamental principles and procedures of accounting. Throughout the course, students will develop the kinds of financial analysis and decision-making skills that will assist them in future studies and/or career opportunities in business. Through the various units of this course, students will: acquire an understanding of computerized accounting and financial analysis; learn how to process accounts for both service and merchandise-based businesses, as well as develop an understanding of current ethical issues in the field of accounting.

Prerequisite: None
BDI3CIntro to Entrepreneurship (BDI3C) focuses on how entrepreneurs recognize opportunities, generate ideas, and organize resources to plan successful ventures and achieve their goals. Through hands-on experiences, students will have opportunities to develop the values, traits, and skills most often associated with successful entrepreneurs.

Prerequisite: None
BMI3CGrade 11 Marketing introduces the fundamental concepts of product marketing and examines how trends, issues, global economic changes, and technology influence consumer buying habits. Throughout this course, students will engage in market research, develop marketing strategies, and produce a marketing plan for a product of their choice.

Prerequisite: None
CGG3OCGG3O discusses issues related to travel and tourism within and between various regions of the world. Throughout this course, students will investigate the unique environmental, sociocultural, economic, and political characteristics of various regions, and examine travel patterns and trends to predict future tourist destinations. They will also investigate the impact of the travel industry on natural environments and human communities.

Prerequisite: CGC1P or CGC1D
CHW3MThis course investigates the history of humanity from earliest times to the sixteenth century. Students will analyse diverse societies from around the world, with an emphasis on the political, cultural, and economic structures and historical forces that have shaped the modern world. They will apply historical inquiry, critical-thinking, and communication skills to evaluate the influence of selected individuals, groups, and innovations and to present their own conclusions.

Prerequisite: CHC2P or CHC2D
ENG3CGrade 11 College English allows students to develop their critical and creative skills, as well as their overall literacy and communication skills; all of which are essential to their success in academics and in their daily lives. Throughout this course, students will study the content, form, and style of various informational and graphic texts, as well as literary texts from Canada and abroad. They will also have the opportunity to practice using language with precision and clarity through the creation of oral, written, and media texts across a variety of practical and academic forms.

Prerequisite: ENG2D or ENG2P
ENG3EGrade 11 Workplace English allows students to enhance their overall literacy and communication skills. Throughout this course, students will study the content, form, and style of various informational and graphic texts, as well as literary texts from Canada and abroad. They will also have the opportunity to practice using language with precision and clarity through the creation of oral, written, and media texts across a variety of practical forms.

Prerequisite: ENG2P
ENG3UGrade 11 College English allows students to develop their critical and creative skills, as well as their overall literacy and communication skills; all of which are essential to their success in academics and in their daily lives. Throughout this course, students will study the content, form, and style of various informational and graphic texts, as well as literary texts from Canada and abroad. They will also have the opportunity to practice using language with precision and clarity through the creation of oral, written, and media texts across a variety of practical and academic forms.

Prerequisite: ENG2D
FIF3UGrade 11 French Immersion provides opportunities for students to speak and interact with increasing confidence and accuracy in French in a variety of academic and social contexts. Throughout this course, students will use their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and apply language learning strategies while exploring a variety of concrete and abstract topics. They will increase their knowledge of the French language through the study of French literature from around the world.

Prerequisite: FIF2D
FSF3UGrade 11 Core French offers students extended opportunities to speak and interact in real-life situations in French. In this course, students will develop their creative and critical thinking skills by exploring, and responding to, a variety of oral and written texts.

Prerequisite: FSF2D
GWL3ODesigning Your Future is a course specifically created to help students prepare for their transition into the world of work. Throughout this course, students will have multiple opportunities to identify and improve upon their existing skill sets. They will then learn how to turn these skills into job prospects in the real world. The course concludes with the creation of a resume, cover letter and practical portfolio, which students can use to propel them further along the path to their dream job.

Prerequisite: None
HFC3MGrade 11 Food and Culture focuses on the foods, flavours, cooking techniques, and cultural traditions of global cuisines. In this course, students will develop practical cooking and food-related etiquette skills as they explore the origins and development of diverse food traditions, examining how Canadian food choices and traditions have been influenced by other cultures.

Prerequisite: None
HRE3OHRE3O allows students to study various religious traditions from around the world so that they may interact with those of other faiths from a place of acceptance and familiarity. This is a survey course that will help students understand the basic similarities and differences between the religious traditions.

Prerequisite: None
HRT3MHRT3M allows students to explore various world religions and belief traditions in greater detail, understanding how their sacred writings and teachings meet various human needs. Students will also examine how time and place influence these religious systems, and develop research and inquiry skills related to the study of human expressions of belief.

Prerequisite: None
HSP3UGrade 11 Anthropology, Psychology & Sociology (HSP3U) provides students with opportunities to think critically about theories, questions, and issues related to these fields. In this course, students will develop an understanding of the approaches and research methods used by social scientists. They will be given opportunities to explore theories from a variety of perspectives, to conduct social science, and to become familiar with current thinking on a range of issues within the three disciplines.

Prerequisite: ENG2D or CHC2D
ICS3UICS3U introduces students to the study of computer science. In this course, students will design software using industry-standard programming tools and applying the software development life-cycle model. As their understanding of the computing environment grows, students will write and use subprograms within computer programs, developing creative solutions for various types of problems. They will also explore environmental and ergonomic issues, emerging research in computer science, and global career trends in related fields.

Prerequisite: None
LKBCUThis course prepares students for university studies in international languages. Students will be provided with abundant opportunities for increasing their competence and confidence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin, while developing their creative and critical thinking skills through exploring and responding to a variety of texts in multiple forms. Students will enhance their ability to use Mandarin with clarity and precision, and will develop the language skills needed to engage in sustained conversations and discussions, understand and evaluate information, read diverse materials for both study and pleasure, and write clearly and effectively.

Prerequisite: Simplified Chinese Level 2 - or equivalent
LYFCUThis course prepares students for studies in the international language. Students will enhance their ability to use the language with clarity and precision, and will develop the language skills needed to engage in sustained conversations and discussions, understand and evaluate information, read diverse materials for both study and pleasure, and write clearly and effectively. Students will also have opportunities to add to their knowledge of the culture of the countries where the language is spoken through the use of community resources and computer technology. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course.

Prerequisite: LYFBD or Assessment Test
MBF3CMBF3C allows students to gain a fundamental understanding of mathematics as a problem-solving tool for use in everyday life. Throughout this course, students will consolidate their mathematical skills as they solve problems based on real-world situations.

Prerequisite: MFM2P or MPM2D
MCF3MThis course introduces the basic features of the function by extending students’ experiences with quadratic relations. It focuses on quadratic, trigonometric, and exponential functions and their use in modelling real-world situations.

Prerequisite: MFM2P or MPM2D
MCR3UGrade 11 Function (MCR3U) course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically, and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse functions; and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Prerequisite: MPM2D
PPZ3CGrade 11 Health for Life encourages students to examine the factors that influence their personal health practices, as well as those that contribute to the development of healthy communities. This course emphasizes the concept of wellness and promotes healthy eating, physical activity, and the construction and maintenance of a positive sense of self. Throughout this course, students will learn how to make healthy choices and create a personalized wellness plan. They will also design initiatives encouraging others to lead healthy, active lives.

Prerequisite: None
SBI3CGrade 11 College Level Biology focuses on the processes that occur in biological systems. Throughout the course, an emphasis will be placed on the practical application of concepts, and on the skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related fields.

Prerequisite: SNC2P or SNC2D
SBI3UGrade 11 Biology seeks to deepen students’ understanding of the processes that occur in biological systems. In this course, students will focus on the theoretical aspects of many of the major disciplines of biological study, and will have multiple opportunities to refine their skill in conducting scientific investigations.

Prerequisite: SNC2D
SCH3UGrade 11 Chemistry allows students to deepen their understanding of chemistry. Throughout this course, students will further develop their analytical skills as they investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment.

Prerequisite: SNC2D
SPH3UGrade 11 Physics allows students to develop their understanding of the basic concepts in physics. Throughout this course, students will analyze the relationships between physics and technology. They will also examine the impact technological applications of physics have on society and the environment using virtual labs and real-world examples.

Prerequisite: SNC2D
SVN3EGrade 11 Environmental Science allows students to develop their fundamental scientific knowledge and skills. SVN3E explores current topics in environmental science and places emphasis on practical applications of scientific and mathematical literacy.

Prerequisite: SNC1D or SNC1P
TPJ3MTPJ3M allows students to develop their understanding of basic health care procedures and safety precautions, as well as core concepts in anatomy and physiology, which will prove useful to student pursuing a career in any healthcare-related field. Throughout this course, students will develop an awareness of health and safety issues in this sector, analyze related environmental and societal issues, and learn about professional practice standards within the health care field.

Prerequisite: None

Grade 10

Course CodeCourse Description
AVI2OGrade 10 Art encourages students to develop their skills in producing and presenting art by introducing them to new ideas, materials, and processes for artistic exploration and experimentation. Throughout this course, students will apply various design elements and principles as they expand their creative process. They will also learn to critically reflect on and interpret art within personal, contemporary, and historical contexts.

Prerequisite: None
BBI2OIntroduction to Business (BBI2O) introduces students to the world of business, including the concepts, functions, and skills required for operating a 21st century business of any size or scale. Throughout this course, students will also learn key concepts relating to personal finance, entrepreneurship, and international business.

Prerequisite: None
BTT2FThis course introduces students to information and communication technology in a business environment and builds the foundation of digital literacy skills that will be necessary for success in a technologically-driven society. In this course, students will have the opportunity to develop their digital literacy, including effective electronic research and communication skills. They will also explore current issues related to the impact of information and communication technology.

Prerequisite: None
BTT2OThis course introduces students to information and communication technology in a business environment and builds the foundation of digital literacy skills that will be necessary for success in a technologically-driven society. In this course, students will have the opportunity to develop their digital literacy, including effective electronic research and communication skills. They will also explore current issues related to the impact of information and communication technology.

Prerequisite: None
CHC2DGrade 10 Canadian History explores the impact of various social, economic, and political developments and events on the lives of different Canadian groups since 1914. Throughout this course, students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on Canadian identity, citizenship, and heritage. They will also seek to develop their ability to interpret and analyze evidence though the investigation of key issues and events in Canadian history from the past century.

Prerequisite: None
CHC2PGrade 10 Canadian History explores the impact of various social, economic, and political developments and events on the lives of different Canadian groups since 1914. Throughout this course, students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on Canadian identity, citizenship, and heritage. They will also seek to develop their ability to interpret and analyze evidence though the investigation of key issues and events in Canadian history from the past century.

Prerequisite: None
CHV2OGrade 10 Civics explores the rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Throughout this course, students will explore issues of civic importance, including healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, all the while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and political processes in their local, national, and/or global communities. Students will also be asked to apply concepts of political inquiry as they investigate and express informed opinions about a range of political issues.

Prerequisite: None
ENG2DGrade 10 English allows students to develop their skills in oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy; all of which are essential to their success in academics and in their daily lives. Throughout this course, students will be asked to analyze literary texts from both contemporary and historical periods, as well as interpret informational and graphic texts. They will also have the opportunity to test out multiple strategies of effective communication through the creation of oral, written, and media texts.

Prerequisite: ENG1D or ENG1P
FIF2DGrade 10 French Immersion encourages students to further develop their language skills through the study of 20th-century European francophone literature and culture. Throughout this course, students will participate in oral communication, reading, and writing activities based on a variety of French literary and media works, including novels, short stories, plays, and articles.

Prerequisite: FIF1D
FSF2DGrade 10 Core French provides students with the opportunity to communicate and interact in French with increasing independence, through a concentrated focus on personally relevant, familiar, and academic topics based upon real-life situations. In this course, students will exchange information, ideas, and opinions with others in guided and increasingly spontaneous spoken interactions. Throughout the course, students will be able to further develop their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing through the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. They will also enhance their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities and will develop the skills necessary to facilitate lifelong language learning.

Prerequisite: FSF1P or FSF1D
GLC2OGrade 10 Careers encourages students to develop the skills, knowledge, and habits that will allow them to be successful in life after graduation. In this course, students will make connections between their skills, interests, and values and the array of post-secondary options available to them. They will also learn about personal financial management.

Prerequisite: None
HIF2OThis course explores common challenges faced by both individuals and families: how to meet basic needs, how to relate to others, how to manage resources, and how to become responsible members of society. Throughout this course, students will explore the diverse ways various families function within society as they learn to develop the interpersonal, decision-making and practical everyday skills necessary to transition into adulthood.

Prerequisite: None
HRE2OThis course invites and challenges the adolescent to personalize the principles that guide Catholics in understanding their role in shaping culture through our discipleship. The exploration of these principles starts with the Scriptural foundations to the questions of what it means to be human and how God has and continues to shape our humanity through culture. The principles are then developed through the Gospel themes that reveal how Jesus’ Kingdom of God is expressed in all of our relationships: to ourselves, to others, to our civil society, to our Church, and to our Global community.

Prerequisite: None
MFM2PThis course allows students to extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through both investigation and abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relations and their applications; solve and apply linear systems; verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry; and investigate the trigonometry of right and acute triangles.

Prerequisite: MPM1D or MFM1P
MPM2DThis course allows students to extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through both investigation and abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relations and their applications; solve and apply linear systems; verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry; and investigate the trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Prerequisite: MPM1D or MFM1P
SNC2DGrade 10 Science allows students to enhance their understanding of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and relates these areas of study to technology, society, and the environment. Throughout this course, students will further develop their skills in planning and conducting scientific investigations. Through the various units of this course, students will seek to deepen their understanding of scientific theories as they relate to: the interaction of light and matter; the forces that affect climate and climate change; the chemical reactions of acids and bases, and the connections between cells and systems in both animals and plants.

Prerequisite: SNC1D or SNC1P
SNC2PGrade 10 Applied Science allows students to enhance their understanding of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and relates these areas of study to technology, society, and the environment. Throughout this course, students will further develop their skills in planning and conducting scientific investigations. Through the various units of this course, students will seek to deepen their understanding of scientific theories as they relate to: the interaction of light and matter; the forces that affect climate and climate change; the chemical reactions of acids and bases, and the connections between cells and systems in both animals and plants.

Prerequisite: SNC1P

Grade 9

Course CodeCourse Description
AVI1OGrade 9 Visual Arts encourages students to develop their skills in producing and presenting art by introducing them to new ideas, materials, and processes for artistic exploration and experimentation. Throughout this course, students will apply various design elements and principles as they expand their creative process. They will also learn to critically reflect on and interpret art within personal, contemporary, and historical contexts.

Prerequisite: None
BBI1OIntroduction to Business (BBI1O) introduces students to the world of business, including the concepts, functions, and skills required for operating a 21st century business of any size or scale. Throughout this course, students will also learn key concepts relating to personal finance, entrepreneurship, and international business.

Prerequisite: None
BTT1FThis course introduces students to information and communication technology in a business environment and builds the foundation of digital literacy skills that will be necessary for success in a technologically-driven society. In this course, students will have the opportunity to develop their digital literacy, including effective electronic research and communication skills. They will also explore current issues related to the impact of information and communication technology.

Prerequisite: None
BTT1OThis course introduces students to information and communication technology in a business environment and builds the foundation of digital literacy skills that will be necessary for success in a technologically-driven society. In this course, students will have the opportunity to develop their digital literacy, including effective electronic research and communication skills. They will also explore current issues related to the impact of information and communication technology.

Prerequisite: None
CGC1DGrade 9 Canadian Geography examines interrelationships within and between Canada’s natural and human systems, looking particularly at how these systems interconnect with those in other parts of the world. Throughout the course, students will explore environmental, economic, and social geographic issues relating to topics such as transportation, sustainable energy choices, and urban development. In doing so, students will learn to use geographical concepts and spatial technologies to investigate various geographic issues with the overarching focus of making Canada a more sustainable place to live.

Prerequisite: None
CGC1FGrade 9 French Immersion Issues in Canadian Geography (CGC1F) examines interrelationships within and between Canada’s natural and human systems, looking particularly at how these systems interconnect with those in other parts of the world. Throughout the course, students will explore environmental, economic, and social geographic issues relating to topics such as transportation, sustainable energy choices, and urban development. In doing so, students will learn to use geographical concepts and spatial technologies to investigate various geographic issues with the overarching focus of making Canada a more sustainable place to live. *This course is taught entirely in French and is only open to students already enrolled in French Immersion.

Prerequisite: grade eight early or late Immersion
CGC1PGrade 9 Canadian Geography examines interrelationships within and between Canada’s natural and human systems, looking particularly at how these systems interconnect with those in other parts of the world. Throughout the course, students will explore environmental, economic, and social geographic issues relating to topics such as transportation, sustainable energy choices, and urban development. In doing so, students will learn to use geographical concepts and spatial technologies to investigate various geographic issues with the overarching focus of making Canada a more sustainable place to live.

Prerequisite: None
ENG1DGrade 9 English allows students to develop their skills in oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy; skills which are essential to their success both in academics and in their daily lives. Throughout this course, students will be asked to analyze literary texts from both contemporary and historical periods, as well as interpret informational and graphic texts. Students will also have the opportunity to learn multiple strategies for effective communication through the creation of oral, written and media texts.

Prerequisite: None
FIF1DGrade 9 French Immersion allows students to enhance their French language skills through the study of 20th-century North American francophone literature and culture. Throughout this course, students will participate in oral communication, reading, and writing activities as they study various works, including novels, poetry, songs, and plays, from French-speaking parts of North America.

Prerequisite: grade eight early or late immersion
FSF1DGrade 9 Core French provides students with the opportunity to communicate and interact in French with increasing independence, through a concentrated focus on familiar topics related to their daily lives. In this course, students will develop their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing by using language learning strategies introduced in the elementary Core French program, and will apply creative and critical thinking skills in various ways. They will also enhance their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities and will develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Prerequisite: Minimum of 600 hours of French instruction or equivalent from Elementary School.
FSF1OGrade 9 Open French (FSF1O) is an introductory course for students who have little or no knowledge of French or who have not accumulated the minimum of 600 hours of elementary Core French instruction. Students will begin to understand and speak French in guided and structured interactive settings, and will develop fundamental skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing through discussing issues and situations that are relevant to their daily lives. Throughout the course, students will develop their awareness of diverse French-speaking communities in Canada and acquire an understanding and appreciation of these communities. They will also develop a variety of skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

Prerequisite: None
FSF1PGrade 9 Core French (FSF1P) emphasizes further development of oral communication, reading, and writing skills. Students will build on and apply their knowledge of French while exploring a variety of themes. Thematic readings, which include a selection of short stories, articles, and poems, will serve as stepping stones to oral and written activities.

Prerequisite: Minimum of 600 hours of French instruction or equivalent from Elementary School.
HIF1OThis course explores common challenges faced by both individuals and families: how to meet basic needs, how to relate to others, how to manage resources, and how to become responsible members of society. Throughout this course, students will explore the diverse ways various families function within society as they learn to develop the interpersonal, decision-making and practical everyday skills necessary to transition into adulthood.

Prerequisite: None
HRE1OThis course engages students in the examination of the Christian narrative as revealed in Sacred Scripture. Throughout this course, students will be invited to develop a deeper understanding of their personal faith through the exploration of Catholic rituals, teachings, practices, morals and values, and virtues.

Prerequisite: None
MFM1PGrade 9 Applied Math allows students to develop an understanding of introductory algebra, proportional reasoning, measurement, and geometry through investigation, technology, and hands-on activities. Students will investigate real-life examples to develop various representations of linear relations, and will determine the connections between the representations. They will also explore certain relationships that emerge from the measurement of three-dimensional figures and two-dimensional shapes. Students will consolidate their mathematical skills as they solve problems and communicate their thinking.

Prerequisite: None
MPM1DThis course encourages students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to algebra, analytic geometry, and measurement and geometry through investigation, technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will investigate relationships, which they will then generalize as equations of lines, and will determine the connections between different representations of a linear relation. They will also explore relationships that emerge from the measurement of three-dimensional figures and two-dimensional shapes.

Prerequisite: None
OVS1OOntario Virtual School (OVS) is proud to offer this free Grade 9 Math Preparation course to assist grade 8 students as they prepare for success in the transition to high school math. This course will allow students to begin developing their understanding of mathematical concepts related to algebra, analytic geometry, measurement and geometry. <h3>OVS1O is specially designed to help you:</h3> <ul> <li>refresh the math skills necessary to succeed in secondary school math courses</li> <li>address the underlying skills gap between elementary school and high school math</li> <li>deepen your understanding of foundational math concepts</li> <li>strengthen your critical thinking skills</li> <li>develop e-learning skills that will allow you to be a confident and active eLearning student in the future</li> <li>prepare for the Grade 9 EQAO math assessment</li> <li>understand the day-to-day applications of math in your daily life & appreciate its importance</li> <li>increase your confidence (and reduce your anxiety) when it comes to math in general!</li> </ul>

Prerequisite: Non
PPL1OGrade 9 Healthy Living equips students with the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy choices and lead healthy, active lives. Through participation in a range of physical activities, students will develop the personal fitness skills that provide a foundation for active living. They will also acquire an understanding of the factors that contribute to healthy development and learn how their own well-being is affected by, and affects, the world around them.

Prerequisite: None
SNC1DGrade 9 Science allows students to develop their understanding of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and relates these areas of study to technology, society, and the environment. Throughout this course, students will learn the essential processes of scientific investigation, which form the basis for all future paths of study across the sciences. Through the various units of this course, students will: acquire an understanding of scientific theories and conduct investigations related to sustainable ecosystems; study atomic and molecular structures and the properties of elements and compounds; explore the universe and discover its properties and components; and learn the basic principles of electricity that have helped shape our modern society.

Prerequisite: None
SNC1PGrade 9 Applied Science allows students to develop their understanding of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and relates these areas of study to technology, society, and the environment. Throughout this course, students will learn the essential processes of scientific investigation, which form the basis for all future paths of study across the sciences. Through the various units of this course, students will: acquire an understanding of scientific theories and conduct investigations related to sustainable ecosystems; study atomic and molecular structures and the properties of elements and compounds; explore the universe and discover its properties and components; and learn the basic principles of electricity that have helped shape our modern society.

Prerequisite: None

Grade 8 & 7

Course CodeCourse Description
LAN7GThe expectations for Grade 7 Language focuses on the consolidation of students’ language knowledge, skills, and strategies and their ability to use them independently and effectively to understand, reflect on, apply, and communicate information and ideas, and for continued learning in school and in a multicultural, multimedia world.

Prerequisite: None
LAN8GThe expectations for Grade 8 Language focuses on the consolidation of students’ language knowledge, skills, and strategies and their ability to use them independently and effectively to understand, reflect on, apply, and communicate information and ideas, and for continued learning in school and in a multicultural, multimedia world.

Prerequisite: None

3.7 Courses of Study

Summary course profiles specific to Ontario Virtual School can be found at https://www.ontariovirtualschool.ca/courses/. If you wish to preview our detailed outlines of courses of study please email [email protected] with your request and arrangements will be made to have it emailed to you.

3.8 Ontario Curriculum Policy Documents

The courses offered at Ontario Virtual School have been developed according to the requirements of the Ontario Ministry of Education. Information on Ministry course documents and Ontario Curriculum Policy documents may be found at the Ministry website, http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/secondary/

3.9 Experiential Learning

While OVS recognizes the tremendous value of job shadowing and cooperative education as it enables learners to apply their knowledge and skills through hands on experiences; we do not offer co-op based courses at this time.

3.10 Withdrawing from a Course

  • Withdrawals occurring within 5 days of the issuing of the first report card from the Ontario Virtual School (OVS) will result in the mark not being recorded on the OST.
  • a withdrawal from a Grade 11 or 12 course after 5 days of the issuing of the first report card results in a “W” being entered in the “Credit” column of the OST along with the mark at the time of the withdrawal.
  • Withdrawals at any time from Grade 9 or 10 courses are not recorded on the OST
  • If there are extraordinary circumstances relating to a student’s withdrawal from a course, an “S” may be entered in the “Note” column on the OST.

3.11 Changing Course Type

Students do have the opportunity in some cases to change the course type. However, each subject area has specific criteria to permit such changes. To discuss your unique situation, please send an email to [email protected] outlining the following information as well as forwarding your most recent transcript by email:

  • Name:
  • Contact information: Address, phone and email address
  • Date of Birth:
  • Last school attended and Year attended:
  • Reason for Request:
  • Special Circumstances:

3.12A Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR)

K-12 students may receive a credit without taking a course if they can demonstrate that they have the skills and knowledge from prior learning to meet the expectations for the course set out in the provincial curriculum. This must be requested in writing to the Principal of Ontario Virtual School. The requesting student will have an opportunity to explain their circumstances. If you wish to apply for such consideration please send us an email outlining the following information as well as forwarding your most recent transcript by email [email protected]

  • Name:
  • Contact information: Address, phone and email address
  • Date of Birth:
  • Last school attended and Year attended:
  • Reason for Request:
  • Special Circumstances:

The Principal will review the application and schedule an interview to conduct an assessment of the skills necessary for the credit equivalency being requested.

3.12B Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) for mature students

Because of the broader life experience of mature students, the requirements concerning the application of PLAR procedures are different for them than for regular day school students.

A mature student is a student who is at least eighteen years of age on or before December 31 of the school year in which he or she registers in an Ontario secondary school program; who was not enrolled as a regular day school student for a period of at least one school year immediately preceding his or her registration in a secondary school program (for mature students, a school year is a period of no less than ten consecutive months immediately preceding the student’s return to school); and who is enrolled in a secondary program for the purpose of obtaining an OSSD.

3.13 Other Ways of Earning Credits

There are many different ways that students can earn high school credits outside of Ontario Virtual School. Registration for these courses require approval from the guidance department. These opportunities include; eLearning, ILC, continuing education courses from public school boards.

3.14 Examination Policies

The final exam is typically a paper-pen evaluation written at a mutually agreed time, date, and location. The final exam will be proctored, meaning a suitable adult with a dedicated identifiable and authentic email address will supervise you writing the final exam. This process ensures the security and integrity of the exam. Any person related or affiliated to the student in a personal way cannot serve as an exam supervisor.

3.15 Ontario Student Record (OSR)

The Ontario Student Record (OSR) is the record of a student’s educational progress through schools in Ontario. The Education Act requires that the principal of a school collect information “for inclusion in a record in respect of each pupil enrolled in the school and to establish, maintain, retain, transfer and dispose of the record”. The act also regulates access to an OSR and states that the OSR is “privileged for the information and use of supervisory officers and the principal and teachers of the school for the improvement of instruction” of the student. Each student and the parent(s) of a student who is not an adult (that is, a student who is under the age of eighteen) must be made aware of the purpose and content of, and have access to, all of the information contained in the OSR.

If a student is enrolled in one or more OVS courses and is also registered either full time or part time in another Ontario secondary school, the OSR will be held by the school where the student is taking the most courses. Please note that OVS is not responsible to hold the OSR for students who have already graduated from another school, the graduating school is obligated to keep those records. If a student has not graduated high school and is exclusively pursuing courses towards their OSSD from Ontario Virtual School, OVS will request, establish and manage the OSR as per the Education Act. Items such as copies of report cards, IEP documentation, community involvement and results of the Ontario Secondary School Literacy test are examples of records kept in an Ontario Student Record.

3.16 Ontario Student Transcript (OST)

The Ontario Student Transcript (OST) is an official document issued by all public or private schools in Ontario. The OST contains a list of the courses completed from grades 9 through 12 including those completed successfully or unsuccessfully. The OST is stored in the OSR and kept for many years after the student graduates. Please note, as per the policies outlined in the Ontario Student Transcript Manual 2010 document, the school that maintains the OSR is also responsible for updating and maintaining the OST. Consequently, if a student is enrolled full time or part time through another school, that school will house the OST. Ontario Virtual School is responsible to assist in this record keeping process by notifying the OST holding school of the course and final achievement of a student taking a course through OVS. When students complete a course through OVS, they will be mailed a final report card. In addition, a second copy will be forwarded to the school that secures the students’ OSR so they can add it to the ongoing list of courses on the students overall transcript. Students that need a certified copy of their Ontario Student Transcript are directed to contact the guidance department of the school that holds their OSR. Students that require their final marks to be faxed to the Ontario University Application Centre are requested to send an email to [email protected] clearly authorizing this request including their first and last name, the course and final mark to be submitted, OEN and OUAC reference number.

D. Supports and Resources

4.1 School Services

Ontario Virtual School recognizes the tremendous demands and stress that students can experience throughout their high school lives. Making course selection choices, looking at a host of post-secondary options, as well as personal & socio-emotional problems are all barriers that obstruct students from achieving to their academic potential. OVS is committed to aiding students in all aspects of their lives, and employs a qualified and experienced guidance counsellor. Please feel free to contact [email protected] if you are interested in having our counsellor contact you.

Ontario Virtual School recognizes the tremendous demands and stress that students can experience throughout their high school lives. Making course selection choices, looking at a host of post-secondary options, as well as personal & socio-emotional problems are all barriers that obstruct students from achieving to their academic potential. OVS is committed to aiding students in all aspects of their lives, and employs a qualified and experienced guidance counselor.

Please feel free to contact us if you are interested in having our councilor contact you.

Ontario Virtual School provides access to Career Cruising for all students whose OSR is held at OVS. This program allows students to plan their education, review their options for post-secondary programs, assist in the course selection process and explore other post graduate options.

Career Cruising is an industry-leading online career guidance and planning system. People of all ages use our tools to find the right career, explore education and training options, and build their own portfolio. Our add-on products extend Career Cruising’s functionality, making it easier for schools to manage their course selection process, communities to meet their workforce development needs, and students to prepare for the SAT/ACT. Learn more about implementing Career Cruising at your school, library, or employment center on our “Products” page.

Ontario Prospects Guide to Career Planning is an annual career planning guide for students in Grades 7 to 12, educators, job counsellors and others seeking career information. Ontario Prospects celebrates and promotes student success in Ontario and includes information on self assessment, job search preparation, the labor market, and post secondary destinations.

Job Bank Canada View Canadian Job Opportunities

Ontario College Application Services

Ontario Universities’ Application Center

Please feel free to contact us if you are interested in having our student support staff contact you.

E.Curriculum

5.1 Program Planning – supporting students at-risk

Ontario Virtual School provides supplementary individual student counseling with respect to course selection and post-secondary planning. By doing so, individual student needs and concerns are met and appropriate plans can be put into place. In addition, the skills and competencies that students acquire through the guidance and career education program outlined in Ontario’s “Creating Pathways to Success: An Education and Career/Life Planning Program for Ontario Schools, 2013” will not only help students succeed in school, but will also contribute to their success in the workplace.

Throughout their secondary school education, students in Ontario Virtual School courses will learn about the educational and career opportunities that are available to them; explore and evaluate a variety of those opportunities; relate what they learn in their courses to potential careers in a variety of fields; and learn to make appropriate educational and career choices.

To this end, OVS:

  • The student success team will contact inactive students and parents to re-engage them with their learning
  • The student success team will work collaboratively with the student to create a customized study and learning plan to empower the student to reach their academic goals
  • The student success team will identify students earning marks less than 65% and provide study tips, test preparation strategies to help the student improve achievement.
  • supports English Language Learners, when necessary, by providing instructional and assessment accommodations within courses;
  • provides opportunities within the Four Areas of Learning in Education and Career/Life Planning (Knowing Yourself, Exploring Opportunities, Making Decisions and Setting Goals, Achieving Goals and Making Transitions) in all newly revised courses;
  • provides individual assistance and short-term counseling to students, when requested;
  • provides current information on post-secondary programs and admission requirements to all of its college/university bound students;
  • provides the opportunity for Grade 8 students to “Reach Ahead” to Grade 9 courses with the approval of their elementary school Principal. This program allows students to explore course options and academic interests early in their high school career;
  • provides access to Career Cruising for all students whose Ontario Student Record is held at Ontario Virtual School. This program allows students to plan their education, review their options for post-secondary programs and assists in the course selection process;
  • communicates directly with Ontario Universities Application Centre and Ontario College Application Service regarding student achievement;
  • communicates directly with post-secondary institutions regarding student achievement.

5.2 English Language Learners

OVS supports English Language Learners, when necessary, by providing instructional and assessment accommodations within courses;

Accommodations related to learning resources, such as

  • extensive use of visual materials;
  • use of adapted texts and bilingual dictionaries;
  • use of dual-language materials;
  • use of technology.

Accommodations related to assessment strategies, such as

  • allowance of extra time;
  • use of alternative assessment strategies (e.g., oral interviews, learning logs, or portfolios);
  • use of simplified language and instructions (e.g., in the context of tasks that require completion of graphic organizers and cloze sentences).

Accommodations may be required to support English language learners, especially those who are in the early stages of learning English or those who have had limited prior schooling.

5.3 Resources

Ontario Virtual School is proud to offer a rich variety of online library and community resources listed below:

The Canadian Encyclopaedia has provided the most comprehensive, objective and accurate source of information on Canada for students, readers and scholars across Canada and throughout the world.

The Internet Public Library (ipl2) is a public service organization and a learning/teaching environment. To date, thousands of students and volunteer library and information science professionals have been involved in answering reference questions for our Ask an ipl2 Librarian service and in designing, building, creating and maintaining the ipl2’s collections. It is through the efforts of these students and volunteers that the ipl2 continues to thrive to this day.

The Cambridge Online Dictionary. Cambridge University Press has been publishing dictionaries for learners of English since 1995. Cambridge Dictionaries Online has been offering these dictionaries completely free of charge since 1999.

Links to Learning is a list of web sites that directly support the Ontario curriculum for students in grades 9 to 12. The focus is on quality and not quantity.

Think Quest Contains over 7,000 websites created by students around the world who have participated in a Think Quest Competition.

Canadian Geographic is a comprehensive source of information on climate prosperity, discover videos, interactive features and learn more about how Canada can prosper in the face of global climate change.

Info Please has been providing authoritative answers to all kinds of factual questions since 1938-first as a popular radio quiz show, then starting in 1947 as an annual almanac, and since 1998. Many things have changed since 1938, but not our dedication to providing reliable information, in a way that engages and entertains.

Science.ca combines rich narrative biography with clear graphic explanation to describe Canada’s greatest scientists and their achievements. The site is visited by thousands of students from across Canada every day, often as part of their provincial school curriculum. It currently receives 15 million hits per year, and over 1 million unique visits per year. The web site is operated by the GCS Research Society, a non-profit organization registered in British Columbia, Canada.

EasyBib (MLA citation creator) A Free Automatic Bibliography and Citation Maker Create a Works Cited instantly! 309,984,633 sources cited to date.

Please feel free to contact us if you are interested in having our student support staff contact you.

www.kidshealth.org is a website for students and parents which provides a rich balance of resources from a health perspective, both physical and mental wellbeing.

5.4 Special Education

Students who have behavioural, communicational, intellectual, physical, or multiple exceptionalities may require special education programs and/or services to benefit fully from their school experience.

Special education programs and services primarily consist of instruction and assessments that are different from those provided to the general student population. These may take the form of accommodations (such as specific teaching strategies, and assistive technology) as outlined in the Ministry of Education’s curriculum policy documents.