GRADE 12
FOUNDATIONS FOR COLLEGE MATHEMATICS
MAP4C | ONLINE COURSE

MCV4U-Grade-12-Calculus-Vectors

Course Title: Grade 12 Foundations for College Mathematics

Course Code: MAP4C

Grade: 12

Course Type: College Preparation

Format: Online School Course

Prerequisite: MBF3C, Foundations for College Math, Grade 11, College OR MCF3M, Functions and Applications, Grade 11, University/College Preparation

Tuition Fee (CAD): $499


Course Description for MAP4C Grade 12 Foundations for College Mathematics Online Course

Grade 12 Foundations for College Mathematics (MAP4C) enables you to broaden your understanding of real-world applications of mathematics. You will analyse data using statistical methods; solve problems involving applications of geometry and trigonometry; solve financial problems connected with annuities, budgets, and renting or owning accommodation; simplify expressions; and solve equations. You will reason mathematically and communicate your thinking as you solve multi-step problems.This course prepares you for college programs in areas such as business, health sciences, and human services, and for certain skilled trades.

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of real-world applicationsof mathematics. Students will analyse data using statistical methods; solve problemsinvolving applications of geometry and trigonometry; solve financial problems connected with annuities, budgets, and renting or owning accommodation; simplifyexpressions; and solve equations. Students will reason mathematically and communicatetheir thinking as they solve multi-step problems. This course prepares students for college programs in areas such as business, health sciences, and human services, and for certain skilled trades.
The mathematical processes are to be integrated into student learning in all areas of this course.
Throughout this course, students will:

  • Problem Solving – develop, select, apply, compare, and adapt a variety of problem-solving strategies as they pose and solve problems and conduct investigations, to help deepen their mathematical understanding
  • Reasoning and Proving – develop and apply reasoning skills (e.g., use of inductive reasoning, deductive
    reasoning, and counter-examples; construction of proofs) to make mathematical
    conjectures, assess conjectures, and justify conclusions, and plan and construct
    organized mathematical arguments;
  • Reflecting – demonstrate that they are reflecting on and monitoring their thinking to help clarify their understanding as they complete an investigation or solve a problem (e.g., by assessing the effectiveness of strategies and processes used, by proposing alternative approaches, by judging the reasonableness of results, by verifying solutions)
  • Selecting Tools and Computational Strategies – select and use a variety of concrete, visual, and electronic learning tools and appropriate computational strategies to investigate mathematical ideas and to solve problems
  • Connecting – make connections among mathematical concepts and procedures, and relate mathematical ideas to situations or phenomena drawn from other contexts (e.g., other curriculum areas, daily life, current events, art and culture, sports)
  • Representing – create a variety of representations of mathematical ideas (e.g., numeric, geometric, algebraic, graphical, pictorial representations; onscreen dynamic representations), connect and compare them, and select and apply the appropriate representations to solve problems
  • Communicating – communicate mathematical thinking orally, visually, and in writing, using precise mathematical vocabulary and a variety of appropriate representations, and observing mathematical conventions
As summarized in Success 2010, the primary purpose of assessment and evaluation is to improve student learning. Information gathered through assessment helps teachers to determine students’ strengths and weaknesses in their achievement of the curriculum expectations in each course. This information also serves to guide teachers in adapting curriculum and instructional approaches to students’ needs and in assessing the overall effectiveness of programs and classroom practices. As part of assessment, teachers provide students with descriptive feedback that guides their efforts towards improvement. Evaluation refers to the process of judging the quality of student work on the basis of established criteria, and assigning a value to represent that quality. All curriculum expectations must be accounted for in instruction, but evaluation focuses on students’ achievement of the overall expectations. A students’ achievement of the overall expectations is evaluated on the basis of his or her achievement of related specific expectations. Teachers will use their professional judgement to determine which specific expectations should be used to evaluate achievement of overall expectations, and which ones will be covered in instruction and assessment but not necessarily evaluated. In order to ensure that assessment and evaluation are valid and reliable, and that they lead to the improvement of student learning, teachers must use assessment and evaluation strategies that:

  • Address both what students learn and how well they learn
  • Are based both on the categories of knowledge and skills and on the achievement level descriptions given in the achievement chart
  • Are varied in nature, administered over a period of time, and designed to provide opportunities for students to demonstrate the full range of their learning
  • Are appropriate for the learning activities used, the purposes of instruction, and the needs and experiences of the students
  • Are fair to all students
  • Accommodate students with special education needs, consistent with the strategies outlined in their Individual Education Plan
  • Accommodate the needs of students who are learning the language of instruction
  • Ensure that each student is given clear directions for improvement
  • Promote students’ ability to assess their own learning and to set specific goals
  • Include the use of samples of students’ work that provide evidence of their achievement
  • Are communicated clearly to students and parents at the beginning of the school year and at other appropriate points throughout the school year.

The achievement chart for mathematics outlines four categories of knowledge and skills. They include; knowledge and understanding, thinking, communication and application. Teachers will ensure that student work is assessed and/or evaluated in a balanced manner with respect to the four categories, and that achievement of particular expectations is considered within the appropriate categories. A final grade is recorded for this course, and a credit is granted and recorded for this course if the student’s grade is 50% or higher. The final grade for this course will be determined as follows:

  • Seventy percent of the grade will be based on evaluations conducted throughout the course. This portion of the grade should reflect the student’s most consistent level of achievement throughout the course, although special consideration should be given to more recent evidence of achievement.
  • Thirty percent of the grade will be based on a final evaluation in the form of an examination and administered towards the end of the course.
All students can succeed. Some students are able, with certain accommodations, to participate in the regular course curriculum and to demonstrate learning independently. Accommodations allow access to the course without any changes to the knowledge and skills the student is expected to demonstrate. The accommodations required to facilitate the student’s learning can be identified by the teacher, but recommendations from a School Board generated Individual Education Plan (IEP) if available can also be consulted. Instruction based on principles of universal design and differentiated instruction focuses on the provision of accommodations to meet the diverse needs of learners.
Examples of accommodations (but not limited to) include:

  • Adjustment and or extension of time required to complete assignments or summative tasks
  • Providing alternative assignments or summative tasks
  • Use of scribes and/or other assistive technologies
  • Simplifying the language of instruction

Teachers will bring additional resources and teaching materials that provide a rich and diverse learning environment. Units in this course profile make specific reference to the intended textbook for this course but can be substituted for any relevant and approved text.

Reference: Mathematics, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2007 (Revised) Ministry of Education of Ontario

Frequently Asked Questions

MAP4C is a Grade 12 Foundations of College Mathematics course at a College preparation level.
4C refers to the Grade level of the courses and the pathway. 4 means it is a grade 12 course and C means it is a college preparation course.
Prerequisite: MBF3C, Foundations for College Mathematics, Grade 11, College Preparation OR MCF3M, Functions and Applications, Grade 11, University/College Preparation
At Ontario Virtual School (OVS) you can complete an online highschool credit course as quickly as 4 weeks, or take as long as 12 months.
Yes, we can send your marks directly to OUAC, OCAS, your home, and to your day school.

Add another course and you will be eligible for $100 off your total fee.

You are now eligible for $100 off you total fee. Use coupon code OVS-100 upon checkout